Urban Tree By-law Public Consultation

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

Consultation has concluded

Please be aware that the survey is now closed.

Should you wish to submit a comment or ask a question, please contact Tara Druzina at 905-468-6468 or tdruzina@notl.org.

The consultant's report regarding this public consultation process will be in front of Council in June, 2018.

Thank you to everyone who participated in this process.


The Town of Niagara-on-the-Lake is assessing the need for a Tree By-law. Such a by-law would regulate the protection and removal of trees on private property within the Town’s urban areas.

We understand that through creating any such by-law, there is a need to balance preservation

Please be aware that the survey is now closed.

Should you wish to submit a comment or ask a question, please contact Tara Druzina at 905-468-6468 or tdruzina@notl.org.

The consultant's report regarding this public consultation process will be in front of Council in June, 2018.

Thank you to everyone who participated in this process.


The Town of Niagara-on-the-Lake is assessing the need for a Tree By-law. Such a by-law would regulate the protection and removal of trees on private property within the Town’s urban areas.

We understand that through creating any such by-law, there is a need to balance preservation and protection of trees and the greater good of the community with the need to respect the rights and responsibilities of individual property owners. As such, we are undertaking public consultation so that we can hear what our residents think on this topic, including whether or not they are in favour of such a by-law and to hear their thoughts on how any such potential by-law would be created.

Should the Town proceed with a Private Tree By-Law, it would only apply to our urban areas. Please see the map below that depicts where a potential by-law would apply. Niagara Region’s Tree and Forest Conservation By-Law (By-Law No. 30-2008) would continue to apply to the regulation of woodlots in the Town.

Consultation has concluded
  • Benefits to Private Tree By-laws

    Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link
    over 2 years ago

    Other municipalities have adopted Private Tree By-laws, citing the overall community benefits of the urban forest, including:

    • Promoting biodiversity, providing habitat and food for wildlife.
    • Supporting human health and improve quality of life.
    • Improving the overall neighbourhood aesthetic and leading to increased property values.
    • Reducing stormwater runoff, reducing summer evaporation and increasing groundwater recharge – leading to improved water quality and quantity. Trees also reduce soil erosion and the possibility of flooding.
    • Improving air quality, through the absorption of carbon dioxide (a greenhouse gas) and release of oxygen. Trees also absorb pollutants, trap...

    Other municipalities have adopted Private Tree By-laws, citing the overall community benefits of the urban forest, including:

    • Promoting biodiversity, providing habitat and food for wildlife.
    • Supporting human health and improve quality of life.
    • Improving the overall neighbourhood aesthetic and leading to increased property values.
    • Reducing stormwater runoff, reducing summer evaporation and increasing groundwater recharge – leading to improved water quality and quantity. Trees also reduce soil erosion and the possibility of flooding.
    • Improving air quality, through the absorption of carbon dioxide (a greenhouse gas) and release of oxygen. Trees also absorb pollutants, trap dust and block noise.
    • Providing protection from the wind and sun, leading to home energy savings.

    You need to be signed in to add your comment.

    comment
    Submitting your comment
    Cancel